East Anglian Traditional Music Trust

 

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Community Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuning In

Blyth Valley Voices

Waveney Maypole

Musical Roots

Waveney Songs

Playback

North End Voices

Stour Valley singers

 

At the heart of the East Anglian Traditional Music Trust's work are the projects we run that involve communities in research and performance of the local traditions.

In 2002, we ran four community projects in Suffolk as part of the Tuning In project.

In 2003 and 2004 we ran Blyth Valley Voices in the area around Southwold on the coast in Suffolk.

In 2004 and 2006  we worked on the Waveney Maypole project in the villages around Harleston in Norfolk on traditional dancing, and in 2005 we ran a song project in Harleston itself, with a final presentation during the Harleston & Waveney Festival. In 2007 we again worked with the Waveney Maypole, this time with Diss Infant School.

In 2004 and 2005 we worked on the Suffolk / Norfolk borders around the small town of Eye, looking at local songs and music through the Musical Roots project.

In 2005 we worked around Norfolk during the Playback project - much oral history research was carried out into dulcimers particularly.

In 2005-2007 we worked with adults and children in King's Lynn on the songs sung by the fishing community, which were first collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1905. This culminated in 2007 with a project with BBC Radio Norfolk called North End Voices.

In 2011-13 we researched the cultural traditions of the Stour Valley, along the Essex-Suffolk border. This included following up two singers, from whom songs had been collected in 1929. Click here to read about Stour Valley singers.

In 2014-15, the results of many years of community and historical research into the history of the dulcimer in East Anglia, the people who played and made the instruments, was published on a new website, www.eastangliandulcimers.org.uk  and more community-based research on this theme is planned for 2015-16. The results will be fed into the dulcimer website as and when we can process the new information.

If you would be interested in working with the East Anglian Traditional Music Trust on a similar project in your community, do please get in touch with us.